Courses

NS 103 Canadian Indigenous Language Immersion for Adult Beginners
*3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, 3-0-0). An introduction to a Canadian indigenous language in an immersion context. No prior knowledge of the focus language is assumed. Note: This course cannot be used as a substitute for NS 152 nor does it prepare the student for NS 105. A student completing this course may still earn credit in NS 152 at a later date. Not for credit in Faculty of Native Studies degree programs.

NS 104 The Structure of a Canadian Indigenous Language through Immersion
*3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, 3-0-0). This course, delivered in an immersion context, is designed for beginning speakers or semi-speakers with only a basic knowledge of the particular Canadian indigenous language being focused in a given section. Topics include word, sentence, and narrative structure as represented in both oral and written forms of the language. Note: This course cannot be used as a substitute for NS 152 nor does it necessarily prepare the student for NS 105. A student completing this course may still earn credit in NS 152 or 153 at a later date. Not for credit in Faculty of Native Studies degree programs.

NS 105 Cree Language Challenge
*3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). This is an exam only course open to fluent speakers of the Cree language. Credit: Pass/Fail.

NS 110 Historical Perspectives In Native Studies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A thematic introduction to the historical relationships, colonial contexts, and social, economic, political and cultural patterns that have shaped the contemporary situation of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Not open to students with credit in NS 210. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 111 Contemporary Perspectives In Native Studies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introductory survey of current issues affecting Aboriginal peoples in Canada and their efforts to confront their colonial relationships with and within Canadian society. Not open to students with credit in NS 211. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 152 Introductory Cree
*6 (fi 12) (two term, 4-0-1). A general introduction to Plains Cree (Y dialect) grammar and vocabulary, with practice in speaking and work in the language laboratory. No prior knowledge of Cree is assumed. Not open to students with matriculation standing in Cree. Note: Students cannot receive credit for NS 152 and NS 153.

NS 153 Introduction to the Structure of the Cree Language for Cree Speakers
*3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). A course designed specifically for fluent speakers of Cree who require an introduction to the Pentland othography writing system and formal training and practice with Cree grammatical structure. The focus is on literacy in the Plains Cree dialect. Note: Students cannot receive credit for NS 152 and NS 153. Prerequisite: NS 105.

NS 190 Academic Writing and Research In the Context of Native Studies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to research and writing skills necessary in an academic environment, with an emphasis on how these methods are used in the discipline of Native Studies. Enrollment by Faculty consent only.

NS 200 Aboriginal Canada: Looking Forward/Looking Back
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-1s-0). For students from faculties outside the Faculty of Native Studies with an interest in acquiring a basic familiarity with Aboriginal/ non-Aboriginal relationships, particularly those in Alberta. Consists of a survey of historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal peoples and newcomers, with the aim of expanding the understandings held by many Canadians about these relationships. Not designed for Native Studies majors.

NS 240 Introduction to Aboriginal Legal Issues
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course is designed to give students an introduction to the development of Aboriginal rights law in Canada. It examines the colonial context of Canadian constitutional law, identifies sources of Aboriginal law, discusses the Treaty and Aboriginal rights and the nature of the fiduciary obligations of the Crown to Aboriginal peoples. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 252 Intermediate Cree
*6 (fi 12) (two term, 3-0-1). Introduction to more complex grammatical structures; ww.ualberta.ca University of Albert A 727 Course Listings The most current Course Listing is available on Bear Tracks. https://www.beartracks.ualberta.ca translation to and from Cree; reading of selected texts; oral practice, including conversation and work on individual projects. Prerequisite: NS 152 or 153.

NS 260 Contemporary Native Art
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the study of contemporary North American Native artists with emphasis on the philosophical and cultural statements made through their artistic expression. Special attention will be placed on living Canadian Native artists.

NS 280 Selected Topics In Native Studies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). NS 290 Introduction to Research and Inquiry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Basic research skills and concepts required in Native Studies will be developed by exploring secondary sources.

NS 300 Traditional Cultural Foundations I
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduces students to the diversity of North American Native peoples. Native traditions are treated as aspects of dynamic cultural systems that have enabled Native peoples to survive and thrive in the centuries prior to European arrival, to resist assimilation efforts, and to persist as culturally distinct peoples. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 314 History of Indians of Western Canada
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of the evolution of Indian/European and Canadian relations in western Canada. Emphasis is on Indian historical perspectives and analyzing events and issues relevant to the various Indian groups of western Canada, including treaties and the history and development of reserves. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 320 Aboriginal Governments and Politics
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The description, analysis, and principles of various Aboriginal governments will be examined. The relative merits of constitutional, legislative, and administrative options for realizing Aboriginal self-government will be compared. A study of the international and Canadian examples of local and regional Aboriginal governments in practice will be an important focus of this course. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 330 Native Economic Development
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course will review underlying factors which affect the economies of Native communities and examine different approaches to Native Economic development, including community, corporate and entrepreneurial business approaches. The Native perspective to Native Economic Development will be a principal theme. The objective of the course will be to assess approaches to the identification, planning, and implementation of economic development strategies for Native communities. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 335 Native People and the Fur Trade
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Perspectives on the economic, cultural, and geographical aspects of the Native fur trade will be explored and examined critically. The influence of the changing relationships between Aboriginal peoples and mercantile trading interests will be assessed through lectures and seminars. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290, or consent of the Faculty.

NS 340 Aboriginal Legal Issues
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A critical overview of Aboriginal legal issues, with particular reference to Alberta and the Northwest Territories. Includes an introduction to customary law and emphasizes the Constitution Acts of Canada, selected federal and provincial legislation, treaties, and major court cases. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or consent of the Faculty. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 345 Management Issues In Native Communities
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The course introduces the major management issues commonly faced by contemporary Native communities, public administration, and business organizations as a result of their unique cultural, social, economic, demographic, and political environment. Students will acquire an orientation to the management process and to modern management theory and practices. In addition, opportunities will be made to develop and practice the managerial skills involved in diagnosis, analysis and resolution of management issues frequently encountered in Native organizations. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 352 Advanced Cree
*6 (fi 12) (two term, 3-0-1). An intensive course designed to enable students to acquire considerable facility both in oral communication and in writing, employing both Roman and syllabic orthography. Prerequisite: NS 252.

NS 355 Native Oral Traditions and Indigenous Knowledge
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course considers oral traditions as aspects of broader, culturally-defined systems of knowledge, in which stories are vehicles for encoding and transmitting knowledge about the people, their culture, and their history. It focuses on new academic and community-based approaches, as well as the complementarity of oral traditions/Indigenous knowledge and Western science. Students will explore the evolving roles of oral traditions for contemporary Native peoples. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 361 Challenging Racism and Stereotypes
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course refutes the concept of “race” as a biological reality and traces the European origins, development, and persistence of racism, stereotypes, and discrimination directed at Aboriginal peoples of North America. Prerequisites: NS 110, NS 111 and NS 240 or NS 290 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 362 Aboriginal Women
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An interdisciplinary approach to understanding historical and contemporary experiences of Aboriginal women. Examines the ways in which Aboriginal women have resisted and been shaped by colonialism and other contemporary racialized gendered practices through an exploration of community, race, gender, sexuality, identity, representation, and activism. The course also considers the ways in which Indigenous knowledge shape alternative ways of conceptualizing and politicizing history, identity, place, self-determination, land rights, resources and wellbeing. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 370 The Métis: The Emergence of a People
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An examination of the factors responsible for the emergence of Métis communities in different areas at different times, with the emphasis on Canada. The development of Métis people together with lifestyles that serve to distinguish them from others will receive much attention. Where applicable, comparisons with similar experiences elsewhere in the world will be made. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 372 Métis Politics
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). An examination of various Métis political debates: identity, recognition, nationalism, political organizing, self-governance structures, constitutionalization of rights, and theories of Indigenous politics. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 376 Native Demography and Disease
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course focuses on the historic epidemic diseases that devastated Native communities following the arrival of Europeans in this hemisphere. Students will study evidence for health and disease and for the size of the Native population before contact, the epidemiology and impacts of infectious diseases that accompanied Europeans to the Americas, and the transition to a different disease profile in the 20th century. Native and European approaches to well-being and disease will be considered. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 380 Selected Topics In Native Studies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 240 or 290 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 390 Research Methods In Native Studies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of different disciplinary methods for conducting Native Studies research and data analysis, this course will also review and critique strategies and techniques applied by social science researchers with Indigenous peoples. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and 290 or consent of Faculty.

NS 400 Traditional Cultural Foundations II
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Uses case studies to examine the dynamic qualities of North American Native cultures and societies. Some have maintained their unique identities over time, while experiencing often-considerable culture change as they have coped with new circumstances, both positive and negative. Others have emerged as new socio-cultural entities. These dynamics operate at multiple levels, from that of the individual to those of larger cultural and social entities. Students will consider ways in which Native peoples are drawing upon earlier cultural forms in creative ways to meet modern needs. Prerequisite: NS 300 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 403 Selected Topics In Native Studies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: One 300-level NS course or consent of the Faculty. Sections may require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.28 University of Albert A www.ualberta.ca Course Listings The most current Course Listing is available on Bear Tracks. https://www.beartracks.ualberta.ca

NS 404 Selected Topics In Native Studies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: One 300-level NS course or consent of the Faculty. NS 405 Selected Topics In International Indigenous Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: One 300-level NS course or consent of the Faculty.

NS 420 Negotiation Strategies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An exploration of the theory and practice of negotiation and mediation from different perspectives, including perspectives from the dominant society and Indigenous peoples. The strategies of litigation, and coercion to overcome conflict and achieve settlements of disputes will also be examined. These negotiation theories will then be applied to concrete dispute situations in Canada, including multi-party disputes over land, governance, development of resources and the environment. This course will be taught in a seminar format. Prerequisite: NS 320 or 340 or consent of the Faculty. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 430 Aboriginal Governance and Partnership Capstone
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course synthesizes and integrates the range of knowledge and analysis from previous Aboriginal governance courses, and normally includes a practical component to enhance the interplay of the theory and actual practice of governance. Prerequisites: Œ6 from the list of required and elective courses for the Certificate in Aboriginal Governance and Partnership [see §124], or consent of the Faculty. NS 390 is also recommended. Students intending to complete the Certificate in Aboriginal Governance and Partnership should complete all other Certificate requirements first. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 435 Management of Aboriginal Natural Resources
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The application of knowledge of resource management to the traditional Native economic activities, especially hunting, fishing and trapping. Conservation problems that developed with the spread of the commercial economy will be analyzed by examining Aboriginal and European approaches to resource management. The uses of conservation to rationalize the re-allocation of traditional resources are examined. Prerequisites: Any Œ6 in EAS 294, 391, ENCS 201, 260 or AUGEO 324, or one 300-level NS course or consent of the Faculty. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 440 Indigenous Treaties and Agreements
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). An exploration of the historical and contemporary issues associated with treaties. Pre- and post-1867 Indian treaties and modern agreements in Canada will be examined. Prerequisite: One 300-level NS course or consent of the Faculty.

NS 441 Indigenous Land Claims and Agreements
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). An exploration of the historical and contemporary issues associated with Indigenous land claims agreements. The background negotiations, and implementation of modern agreements in Canada will be the focus of this course. Prerequisite: One 300-level NS course or consent of the Faculty. NS 440 is also recommended.

NS 442 Colonialism and the Criminal Justice System
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Focuses on pertinent aspects of the Canadian criminal justice process as it relates to the experiences of Aboriginal peoples. In particular, issues pertaining to historical and emerging trends such as restorative justice and ‘native prisons’ are explored and critically analyzed, both in terms of how the justice process functioned historically, as well as its links to contemporary social relations such as the state, the media and the military, but also the powerful role played by racism and discrimination in shaping Aboriginal experiences with the criminal justice process. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and one 300-level NS course or consent of the Faculty.

NS 445 Community Development Processes
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In a seminar, students will identify, analyze and integrate community development philosophy, principles and practice. The relevance of traditional community development models to Native communities will be critically examined in light of the recent experiences of Native communities themselves. Prerequisites: NS 330 or 345 or 390 or consent of the Faculty. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 450 Practicum In Native Studies
*3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). A supervised work-based experience that will permit students to apply Native Studies knowledge in a professional context thereby gaining an appreciation of the work environment. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Œ90, including a minimum of Œ9 in Native Studies courses; a minimum GPA of 2.0 on the last Œ30; consent of the Faculty.

NS 476 Perspectives on Aboriginal Health and Well-Being
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A critical overview of the literature and contemporary health issues affecting Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Special focus is on the meanings of health, socio-economic and environmental determinants of health and the socio-political landscape of Aboriginal health research and healthcare policy. Prerequisites: NS 376 or consent of the Faculty.

NS 485 Urban Aboriginal Issues and Identities
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Critically examines some of the core issues facing Aboriginal peoples living in Canada’s cities, with a particular emphasis on how these issues affect the ways that urban Aboriginal communities are governed municipally, provincially and federally, as well as how they form their own self-government institutions in urban areas. Prerequisites: NS 110, 111 and one 300-level NS course, or consent of the Faculty. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

NS 490 Community-Based Research
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). A seminar exploring the issues in the area of community-based research. The course will be organized primarily around the examination of case studies. Methodological concerns will focus on the political, cultural, ethical, and practical aspects of conducting community-based research in conjunction with Native groups and communities. Prerequisite: NS 390.

NS 498 Honors Paper or Project
*6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-3s-0). For students in the Honors program in Native Studies in their final year. Prerequisite: NS 390.

NS 499 Research Project
*3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-3). The research project is designed to provide students with a variety of options for carrying out their own research. The specific route taken will depend upon the resources of the Faculty, opportunities available in the community, and the skills of the student. While the program is intended to be flexible, the main route around which students may design their projects will be research conducted in conjunction with a local Aboriginal organization or community. Prerequisite: consent of the Faculty of N